Mocking up hexagon tiles for a dungeon map building game

August 25, 2013

I needed to mock up a few graphics and found that Second Life was a good 3D graphics package to create some quick graphics to print out and play test.

Image

I first started out building up a crude hexagon with some basic textures I had in my inventory.

Image

I added some lights and setup my camera to look strait down at the tile. This is the image I can use to print off.

Image

When I was looking at different options available for me to print with The  Game Crafter, I cut up some index cards to match the dimensions and get a visual on their actual sizes.

Image

My first attempt at determining how to tiles would look. I started out by making a system of caves.

Image

Over time, I made many different versions of tiles. Some where used just to identify the possible combinations rather than looking like tiles. I created tons of tiles and kept working at different ways to use them.
ImageI created a template on a 8.5×11 sheet of paper that I could use to draw more tiles at a high resolution. The idea was to draw each tile using the template to trace from, and then reduce the scanned tile to fit within the size of the hex tile.


Inventory Service

October 4, 2009

I’ve spent the majority of the day working on a robust PHP script that permits an in-world inventory server to connect to a web-based service. It sounds simple enough, but the validation is killer. I only have one part of a few parts that I’m still working on. Connection is done. I need to work on a cron job to verify the URL still works, and I also need to work on the API to permit a list of the inventory to be stored on the web service.

One thing that I found pleasing was the capability of asynchronous HTTP communications. I start to make a request with llHTTPRequest. While that is happening, the URL that it is contacting tries to contact the same script on the http_request event. The http_request event verifies information from the server and returns additional information to verify that it is coming from the same script that originated the request. Finally, the http_response event gets the results from the llHTTPRequest and both client/server are happy.

I’m still uncertain if I should focus on the scavenger hunt idea or not since Peter Stindberg pointed out a scavenger hunt system made by iRika. However, it appears that hers is not web-based. The power of the web permits grid-wide (and even cross-grid) scavenger hunts. In addition, it permits profiles where people can choose to show which scavenger hunts they completed, and the reward associated with it. This is sort of like a trophy system. Imagine a large treasure hunt also that allows multiple people to hide items – like the great grid-wide goldrush and the Great Grid-Wide Easter Egg Hunt, but instead, you have to log onto other grids as well to get the entire collection. Another possibility would be to exchange found treasures for others similar to how the in-world Geocaching works. In this sense, you could leave a “bug” in one cache, and see how far it moves as others find it and put it into other cache’s. Because the back-end is connected to a database, you wouldn’t be limited by memory constraints. I found one treasure hunt that boasts support for 4,000 items. This is nothing with the power of a database.

Another item that I found on XStreetSL provided people with a set of gold bars to be hidden around a region. With the system I was thinking about, I could sell collections individually like this (but with different types of ingots like copper, iron, silver), or provide the ability to drop a script into your own objects. I believe iRika does something similar to this. Another product offers different flags to add some variety.

Although I am working with the web, I was also thinking of how to simplify things. In this case, the web should be completely optional. Even a checklist could be dynamically updated. I could add a button for it to list active treasure hunts in the current region, and then display a list of items for them to find. Perhaps some treasure hunts could be marked as private to group members only, individual people, or peoples avatars who are older or younger than a specific age. Another idea would be to require someone to be standing within a short distance whose rezday is today, in order for other people to claim the treasure. Or perhaps their name has to begin with a specific letter like lucky chairs, or a minimum number of people need to be near by similar to mob vend. With the capabilities of a website on the back-end, I could even set items up so that people would have to post a snapshot to bloghud, snapzilla, or mixoom in order to retrieve their prize. There are tons of ways to expand the idea of how to hunt for things. Oh, and the most awesome one – teams!

However, if it’s not the way to go, I could look into the UFO game again. I pretty much had a working concept setup for it. There were still a few other ideas to go along with it as well.


Weekly Challenge #177 – Peas in a Pod

September 7, 2009

I just finished my entry for the 100 word stories weekly challenge #177, peas in a pod. Each week, everyone is invited to compose a story of only 100 words for a given topic. The winner gets to choose the topic for the next week. I find it fun and interesting because the audio aspect of it (optional) gives me a bit of creativity with sound effects and such. This week, I used Microsoft Songsmith for my background music. I think I finally found a use for that software that isn’t so corny. In addition, I put on my Foley artist hat and added a lot of sound effects using Audacity to really give it some life. I’m a bit tempted to make a small machinima to go with it as well.

Here is my entry:

The professor guided his android daughter, Sally, into the cloning machine. He closed the door and turned it on. The machine started making loud noises until it came to a complete stop. Sally stepped out of the machine. Than, Sally stepped out of it again. The two girls were like peas in a pod. He couldn’t tell one from the other. The two girls looked at each other, and then looked at the professor. They giggled and then pushed him into the machine and ran it in reverse. The professor came out, only half the man he used to be.

I can’t wait to hear what the others have entered.

Download MP3: Lewis Moten – 100 word stores 117 – peas in a pod

Ok, I went ahead and made a little machinima as well. It’s pretty simple and quick. I used Windows Movie Maker to piece it all together.


%d bloggers like this: